Dawn at the House

   
 
Dawn at the Lane House,

in the early morning light,

the flowers glow like sunshine,

and are such a pretty sight.
In the background are

the mountains,

where leaves will

start to turn,

the season is changing,

as the sunshine slowly burns.
These flowers were

just a wilderness,

two or three weeks ago,

and now they’ve bloomed to beauty,

and are worth more than

silver or gold.
© Elaine Wood-Lane

9/16/15
Sometimes the greatest beauty comes from the wildest, most unmanageable things in our lives. These sunflowers were a total mess about a month ago, taking over everything in the front flower beds and yard. We couldn’t even open our back gate on the south side of the yard because these plants had grown so wild, tall, and heavy. So I cleaned up the yard, chopped down some of the sunflower, mint, and purple thistle as well as some wild ash seedlings. Now, just a few weeks later, I don’t care if the entire yard is covered up with these sunflowers because they are beautiful, glowing, and cheerful. They seem like a message from God telling us that if He can turn a wild jungle mess into a beautiful sunflower garden, just imagine what He can do with us.

Isaiah 61:3

and provide for those who grieve in Zion—to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of joy instead of mourning, and a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair. They will be called oaks of righteousness, a planting of the Lord for the display of his splendor.

I hope you have a wonderful day and, if God chooses to make you into a beautiful sunflower garden, don’t resist Him too much. He knows what He’s doing, all the time!
Peace and love,  Elaine

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No Wise Words to Say–NaPoWriMo Day 9

Jackson Pollock, Convergence, 1952

I have no wise words to say
on this most usual Thursday.

So far this morning I’ve read
countless poems
by brilliant poets participating
in NaPoWriMo just as I am this month.

I’ve watched a video of a nun
visiting great art of the 20th century
and heard her describe the significance
of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning,
Mark Rothko, and Andy Warhol.

I’ve read new messages about
my sponsored Compassion children
in Peru and Rwanda and in my heart
compared my life of relative wealth
to their lives of hardship and loss.

All these things are what I love.
Walter de la Mare was the first poet
I learned about and loved.
Then came Robert Frost, Mary Oliver,
William Carlos William, and Billy Collins.
Somewhere along the way,
I decided I wanted to write poetry
that would be read and inspire
others like they inspire me.

I’ve seen Jackson Pollock, Rothko,
and Warhol’s art live and in person
at the Chicago Institute of Art.
Pollock’s painting was so large and
had such depth of expression,
that when I saw it, I sat down in stunned
silence, tears sliding down my face as
the full experience and meaning
touched my soul.

My Compassion children,
Dayana and Niyonkuru,
have my heart even though
I’ve never met them, seen them,
or touched their little faces.
They’re so grateful and loving,
and the letters and pictures
we exchange have connected
us across thousands of miles,
different cultures and experiences.

The common theme this morning,
for me,
is the beauty to be found in life,
in poetry, art, people, and God.

I have no wise words to say
about these things.

You have to open your own eyes,
your own mind, heart, and soul,
to see beauty in everything yourself.

God made so much beauty in
the world for us to appreciate.
Try to find some today, enjoy it,
relish it, breathe it into your soul,
and say, “Thank you,” for the beauty.

Peace and love,

©Elaine Wood-Lane
4/9/15

Moon Shine on Snow

3:30 in the morning, and my dog decides
we need to go outside.

I stumble into a robe,
my slippers,
and out the front door.
Buddy runs out into the new snow.

I look up and gasp in wonder.
A nearly full moon shines from
behind Pikes Peak onto
the brand new sparkly snow
below and I am shocked and awed.

This cold, cold snow that has fallen
and fallen and fallen and enshrouded
the country in frigid weariness and
cabin fever is suddenly…
breathtaking and beautiful, perfect.

I suddenly realize Buddy
is pawing at my leg, ready to go inside.
It is ten degrees and I am reluctant,
strangely, to leave the beauty.

Robes and slippers are no
barrier against the cold though,
so in we go, back to bed, to sleep,
perchance to dream of beauty
in the snowy night.

©Elaine Wood-Lane
3/5/15

Beginning of the Dream

Do you have a dream?
The hard part is beginning.
Then comes…the beauty.

Don’t be afraid to begin your dream!

I have to admit, my least favorite part of any project or dream pursuit is the beginning. Getting my footing, or rhythm, is always a little rocky. I’m unsure of myself, whether the dream or project is too big for me or silly or even something I should be doing at all. Certainly I can offer nothing new, worthwhile, or beautiful, right? But, if it’s an idea or dream that won’t let me go, I have to try! So, I begin. The first rows of knitting or crocheting or the first lines of a poem or story are always scary and awkward. After a little while, though, the rhythm is set, the pattern is known, and the words come more freely. Elation is my reward, and yours, for pursuing a dream!

Dreamy Lace Baby Throw, Lion Brand Pound of Love, Honey Bee
A small dream for a newborn life…

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